Fenway Park

1912 - Present

Boston, MA
Historic Aerials
What Was There

Team Years Games
Red Sox
(1912 - 2019)
8410
Braves
(1913 - 1946)
87
No-Hitters

9/9/1914: George Davis

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE
George Davis
9.0
0
0
0
5
4
0
7
32
27
2
Opposing Starter: Ben Tincup
Catcher: Hank Gowdy
Plate Umpire: Ernie Quigley/Mal Eason
Attendance: 10000
Time of Game: 2:00
Did You Know?
  • George "Iron" Davis threw the first no-hitter at Fenway Park in a game where his Braves borrowed the venue from the Red Sox.
  • It came in Davis' ninth career start and gave him only his second career win.
  • This was also the first no-hitter to be thrown at a park by a member of the opposite league. The Braves borrowed Fenway Park from the Red Sox to take advantage of the distant right field wall, which was 404 feet from home plate. Manager George Stallings knew the Phillies hit a lot of their homers over the right field fence and South End Grounds was only 304 feet to right field and 235 feet down the right field line.
  • Home plate umpire Ernie Quigley was knocked unconscious in the second inning by a foul tip to his neck but was able to return to action in the fourth inning.
  • Davis' father was a member of the New York State Senate and Davis was a law student at Harvard University who reported late to the Braves in 1914 because he was still attending classes when spring training began.
  • His seven career wins are the second fewest among no-hit pitchers (Bobo Holloman had only three).

6/21/1916: Rube Foster

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE
Rube Foster
9.0
0
0
0
3
3
0
3
29
25
0
Opposing Starter: Bob Shawkey
Catcher: Bill Carrigan
Plate Umpire: George Hildebrand
Attendance: 4528
Time of Game: 1:21
Did You Know?
  • Fenway Park was already more than four years old before Foster became the first Red Sox pitcher to throw a no-hitter there.
  • Foster walked three Yankees--Les Nunamaker in the sixth, Hugh High in the seventh, and Lee Magee in the eighth--but only Nunamaker made it as far as second base.
  • Prior to throwing his no-hitter, Foster made five consecutive relief appearances and hadn't started since May 18 when he allowed a season-high 13 hits to the St. Louis Browns.
  • This was the second of three no-hitters caught by Bill Carrigan (Joe Wood vs. Browns on July 29, 1911 at Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds in Boston; Dutch Leonard vs. Browns on August 30, 1916 at Fenway Park).

8/30/1916: Dutch Leonard

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE
Dutch Leonard
9.0
0
0
0
2
3
0
2
29
27
0
Opposing Starter: Carl Weilman
Catcher: Bill Carrigan
Plate Umpire: Brick Owens
Attendance: 8500
Time of Game: 1:35
Did You Know?
  • This was the first of two career no-hitters thrown by Dutch Leonard (vs. Tigers on June 3, 1918 at Tiger Stadium in Detroit).
  • Leonard started the first game of a doubleheader against the Browns only a day before, but retired only one of five batters he faced before being replaced by Babe Ruth.
  • The Browns put only two runners on base--Hank Severeid walked with two outs in the eighth and Grover Hartley, pinch-hitting for pitcher Carl Weilman, walked in the ninth--but neither man reached second base.
  • Right fielder Harry Hooper saved Leonard's no-hitter in the first inning when he sprinted into the gap, speared George Sisler's line drive, and crashed into the fence but held on to the ball.
  • Hooper and left fielder Duffy Lewis robbed Jimmy Austin of hits, and shortstop Everett Scott took a hit away from Severeid in the fifth.
  • Leonard received a $100 bonus from Red Sox owner Joseph Lannin a day after tossing his no-hitter.
  • After the game the Browns claimed Boston manager and catcher Bill Carrigan soaked the baselines to minimize St. Louis' speed, and that Leonard threw at their heads for the first three innings.
  • This was the third of three no-hitters caught by Bill Carrigan (Joe Wood vs. Browns on July 29, 1911 at Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds in Boston; Rube Foster vs. Yankees on June 21, 1916).

4/24/1917: George Mogridge

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE
George Mogridge
9.0
0
1
0
3
3
0
6
32
26
1
3
Opposing Starter: Dutch Leonard
Catcher: Les Nunamaker
Plate Umpire: Tommy Connolly
Attendance: 3219
Time of Game: 2:01
Did You Know?
  • Mogridge's no-hitter was the first thrown by a Yankee in franchise history.
  • The Red Sox tied the game at 1-1 with a run in the bottom of the seventh--Jack Barry walked and Del Gainer grounded to second baseman Fritz Maisel, but shortstop Roger Peckinpaugh dropped Maisel's throw and all were safe on the error. Barry and Gainer advanced on Duffy Lewis' sacrifice bunt and the bases were loaded when Mogridge intentionally walked Tillie Walker to set up a double play, but Barry scored on pinch-hitter Jimmy Walsh's sacrifice fly and New York manager Bill Donovan signaled pitchers to warm up in the bullpen.
  • The Yankees scored the go-ahead and eventual winning run in the top of the 9th on an infield single by Peckinpaugh who stole second base and went to third on a throwing error by catcher Hick Cady, then scored on Les Nunamaker's grounder to third baseman Mike McNally whose low throw first baseman Del Gainer couldn't handle.

6/23/1917: Babe Ruth (0)/Ernie Shore (9)

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE Entered Exited
Babe Ruth
0.0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
-1 -1
Ernie Shore
9.0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
26
26
0
-1 -1
Opposing Starter: Doc Ayers
Catcher: Pinch Thomas/Sam Agnew
Plate Umpire: Brick Owens
Attendance: N/A
Time of Game: 1:40
Did You Know?
  • Babe Ruth faced one batter---second baseman Ray Morgan---walked him and was ejected from the game after arguing with and allegedly punching home plate umpire Brick Owens. Ernie Shore entered the game in relief, Morgan was thrown out stealing and Shore went on to retire all 26 batters he faced.
  • For many years Shore was credited with a perfect game, but it's now considered a combined no-hitter.
  • Catcher Pinch Thomas was also ejected and replaced by Sam Agnew who went 3 for 3 with a double, two runs and an RBI for the Red Sox.| It was the second time a catcher didn't complete a no-hitter he started and is one of five times the starting catcher was either replaced or moved to another position (Walt Tragesser/Hank Gowdy vs. Pirates on June 16, 1916 at Braves Field in Boston; Andy Etchebarren/Larry Haney vs. Tigers on April 30, 1967 at Memorial Stadium in Baltimore; Bill Heath/Gene Oliver vs. Braves on August 19, 1969 at Wrigley Field in Chicago; Gene Tenace/Ray Fosse vs. Angels on September 28, 1975 at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum).
  • Ruth was suspended for 10 days and didn't pitch again until July 3.
  • On July 11 he almost threw his own no-hitter when he held the Tigers hitless for 7 1/3 innings before Donie Bush broke up the no-hitter with a smash off Ruth's leg that couldn't be recovered in time to get Bush at first, and Ruth settled for a one-hitter.

7/1/1920: Walter Johnson

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE
Walter Johnson
9.0
0
0
0
0
10
0
1
28
28
1
Opposing Starter: Harry Harper
Catcher: Val Picinich
Plate Umpire: Ollie Chill
Attendance: N/A
Time of Game: 1:46
Did You Know?
  • An error by second baseman Bucky Harris on Harry Hooper's grounder to lead off the seventh inning ended Johnson's bid for a perfect game.
  • Hooper almost broke up Johnson's no-hitter with two outs in the ninth when he hit a ball towards first that bounced high above the bag and was headed for right field, but first baseman Joe Judge leapt into the air, snagged the ball, and flipped to Johnson covering first for the final out.
  • The Senators' run came in the bottom of the seventh when Braggo Roth scored with two outs after Howie Shanks sent him to third with his third hit of the game and Harris knocked him in with a single that bounced over pitcher Harry Harper's head.
  • This was the second of three no-hitters caught by Val Picinich (Joe Bush vs. Indians on August 26, 1916 at Shibe Park in Philadelphia; Howard Ehmke vs. Athletics on September 7, 1923 at Shibe Park).

8/21/1926: Ted Lyons

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE
Ted Lyons
9.0
0
0
0
1
2
0
2
29
27
0
0
1
Opposing Starter: Slim Harriss
Catcher: Johnny Grabowski
Plate Umpire: Bill McGowan
Attendance: 10000
Time of Game: 1:45
Did You Know?
  • Ted Lyons walked leadoff man Jack Tobin in the bottom of the first, but retired the next 19 Red Sox before Bill Hunnefield's error in the bottom of the seventh broke his streak.
  • Where pitch count is available, Lyons' 81 pitches are the fewest thrown by a starter in a no-hitter.
  • Lyons went into this game with a modest 23-inning scoreless streak that extended to 32 with his no-hitter before it was finally snapped at 41 when the Washington Senators scored an unearned run in the bottom of the 10th inning in his next start on August 26.

7/14/1956: Mel Parnell

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Mel Parnell
9.0
0
0
0
2
4
0
3
28
26
0
1
1
15
7
1
0
Opposing Starter: Jim McDonald
Catcher: Sammy White
Plate Umpire: Bill Summers
Attendance: 14542
Time of Game: 1:42
Did You Know?
  • This was the first no-hitter thrown by a Red Sox pitcher since Howard Ehmke tossed one against the Athletics on September 7, 1923 at Shibe Park in Philadelphia and the first one at Fenway Park since 1926 (Ted Lyons vs. Red Sox on August 21, 1926).
  • Parnell, a two-time All-Star who received MVP votes in four of five seasons from 1949-1953 and averaged 18 wins a year, suffered injuries and went 7-12 over his previous 19 decisions dating back to 1954.
  • He pitched in 289 games in his 10-year career but only 14 more after his no-hitter due to those injuries, including a torn nerve in his left elbow that ended his career.
  • He made the final play of the game when former teammate Walt Dropo grounded back to the mound and rather than risk throwing the ball away, Parnell ran to first base and made the out himself.
  • After the game, Parnell claimed he threw his sinker 80% of the time.
  • Second baseman Billy Goodman insisted that had Parnell not walked Billy Esposito to start the top of the ninth he would have lost his no-hitter when Luis Aparicio grounded to a spot that wouldn't have been covered had the Red Sox not been playing at double play depth and Aparico would have had a hit.
  • Parnell received a new contract that called for a $500 raise.

7/20/1958: Jim Bunning

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Jim Bunning
9.0
0
0
0
2
12
1
3
30
27
0
0
0
5
10
1
1
Opposing Starter: Frank Sullivan
Catcher: Red Wilson
Plate Umpire: Frank Umont
Attendance: 29529
Time of Game: 2:02
Did You Know?
  • This is the first of two career no-hitters thrown by Jim Bunning (vs. Mets on June 21, 1964 at Shea Stadium in New York).
  • According to contemporary accounts, Bunning threw 51 fastballs, 49 sliders, 25 curves, and seven changeups.
  • Tigers shortstop Billy Martin knocked Red Sox second baseman Pete Runnels out of the game with a hard slide in the first inning that increased Bunning's chance of throwing a no-hitter. Runnels, a two-time batting champion, had a career .333 batting average against Bunning in 105 career at-bats and hit .438 against him in 1958.

6/26/1962: Earl Wilson

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Earl Wilson
9.0
0
0
0
4
5
0
4
31
27
0
0
0
8
14
1
0
Opposing Starter: Bo Belinksy
Catcher: Bob Tillman
Plate Umpire: Harry Schwarts
Attendance: 14002
Time of Game: 2:24
Did You Know?
  • Earl Wilson was the first African-American to pitch for the Red Sox and the first to throw a no-hitter in the American League.
  • Wilson is the third pitcher to homer in a game in which he threw a no-hitter and is one of four (Wes Ferrell vs. Browns on April 29, 1931 at League Park IV in Cleveland; Jim Tobin vs. Dodgers on April 27, 1944 at Braves Field in Boston; Rick Wise vs. Reds on June 23, 1971 at Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati).
  • This was the first of two no-hitters caught by Bob Tillman (Dave Morehead vs. Indians on September 16, 1965 at Fenway Park in Boston).
  • Wilson earned a $1,000 raise thanks to his no-no.
  • Losing pitcher Bo Belinksy had pitched his own no-hitter against the Orioles just seven weeks before.

9/16/1965: Dave Morehead

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Dave Morehead
9.0
0
0
0
1
8
0
1
28
27
0
0
0
12
7
2
0
Opposing Starter: Luis Tiant
Catcher: Bob Tillman
Plate Umpire: Ed Runge
Attendance: 1247
Time of Game: 2:00
Did You Know?
  • This was the second of two no-hitters caught by Bob Tillman (Earl Wilson vs. Los Angeles Angels on June 26, 1962 at Fenway Park).
  • The paid attendance of 1,247 was the smallest in a no-hitter since 1944 (Clyde Shoun vs. Braves on May 15, 1944 at Crosley Field in Cincinnati), but there were 1,123 fans who were there on passes, and by the time the no-hitter was over there were at least 3,000 fans in the stands.
  • Less than an hour later the Red Sox announced the firing of general manager Mike "Pinky" Higgins, who was fired in the fifth inning.
  • Bonuses were illegal so Red Sox owner Tom Yawkey rewrote Morehead's contract so he could add $1,000 to it.

4/27/2002: Derek Lowe

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE Pit Str Lk Sw GB FB LD PU
Derek Lowe
9.0
0
0
0
1
6
0
1
28
27
0
0
0
97
66
27
8
13
8
0
1
Opposing Starter: Delvin James
Catcher: Jason Varitek
Plate Umpire: Steve Rippley
Attendance: 32837
Time of Game: 2:28
Did You Know?
  • Derek Lowe's no-hitter came in opposing pitcher Delvin James' third career start and was one of only eight career appearances for James.
  • Only a third inning walk to Brent Abernathy kept Lowe from throwing a perfect game.
  • This was the second of four no-hitters caught by Jason Varitek (Hideo Nomo vs. Orioles on April 4, 2001 at Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore; Clay Buchholz vs. Orioles on September 1, 2007 at Fenway Park in Boston; Jon Lester vs. Royals on May 19, 2008 at Fenway Park).

9/1/2007: Clay Buchholz

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE Pit Str Lk Sw GB FB LD PU
Clay Buchholz
9.0
0
0
0
3
9
1
4
30
26
0
0
0
115
73
22
17
6
11
3
1
Opposing Starter: Garrett Olson
Catcher: Jason Varitek
Plate Umpire: Joe West
Attendance: 36819
Time of Game: 3:02
Did You Know?
  • Clay Buchholz's no-hitter came in only his second career start after he made his major league debut on August 17, 2007. This was the third of four no-hitters caught by Jason Varitek (Hideo Nomo vs. Orioles on April 4, 2001 at Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore; Derek Lowe vs. Devil Rays on April 27, 2002 at Fenway Park in Boston; Jon Lester vs. Royals on May 19, 2008 at Fenway Park). At three hours and two minutes, this is the slowest no-hitter thrown by a single pitcher in major league history (the two slowest were combined no-hitters).

5/19/2008: Jon Lester

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE Pit Str Lk Sw GB FB LD PU
Jon Lester
9.0
0
0
0
2
9
0
2
29
27
0
0
0
130
86
23
18
11
7
2
0
Opposing Starter: Luke Hochevar
Catcher: Jason Varitek
Plate Umpire: Brian Knight
Attendance: 37746
Time of Game: 2:30
Did You Know?
  • This was the fourth of four no-hitters caught by Jason Varitek and made him the first catcher to accomplish the feat (Hideo Nomo vs. Orioles on April 4, 2001 at Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore; Derek Lowe vs. Devil Rays on April 27, 2002 at Fenway Park in Boston; Clay Buchholz vs. Orioles on September 1, 2007 at Fenway Park).