Braves Field
aka Bee Hive; National League Field

1915 - 1952

Boston, MA
Historic Aerials
What Was There

Team Years Games
Braves
(1915 - 1952)
2811
Red Sox
(1916 - 1932)
60
No-Hitters

6/16/1916: Tom Hughes

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE
Tom Hughes
9.0
0
0
0
2
7
0
3
30
28
1
Opposing Starter: Erv Kantlehner
Catcher: Walt Tragesser/Hank Gowdy
Plate Umpire: Bill Klem
Attendance: 2200
Time of Game: 1:30
Did You Know?
  • Three Pirates reached base--Honus Wagner and Bill Hinchman walked and Walter Schmidt was safe on third baseman Red Smith's error--but Hughes had a mostly easy time and required no extraordinary effort from his defense.
  • Pirates players lined up on the top step of the dugout in the ninth inning to see if Hughes could complete his no-hitter and earned praise for not heckling or trying to distract him.
  • Starting catcher Walt Tragesser left the game in the first inning after taking a foul tip off the thumb of his throwing hand and was replaced by Hank Gowdy. It was the first time a catcher couldn't complete a no-hitter he started and is one of five times the starting catcher was either replaced or moved to another position (Pinch Tomas/Sam Agnew vs. Senators on June 23, 1917 at Fenway park in Boston; Andy Etchebarren/Larry Haney vs. Tigers on April 30, 1967 at Memorial Stadium in Baltimore; Bill Heath/Gene Oliver vs. Braves on August 19, 1969 at Wrigley Field in Chicago; Gene Tenace/Ray Fosse vs. Angels on September 28, 1975 at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum).

4/27/1944: Jim Tobin

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Jim Tobin
9.0
0
0
0
2
6
0
2
29
27
0
0
0
10
11
0
0
Opposing Starter: Fritz Ostermueller
Catcher: Phil Masi
Plate Umpire: Bill Stewart
Attendance: 1934
Time of Game: 1:30
Did You Know?
  • When Jim Tobin homered off Fritz Ostermueller in the bottom of the eighth inning he became the second pitcher to homer in a game in which he also threw a no-hitter and is one of four to accomplish the feat (Wes Ferrell vs. Browns on April 29, 1931 at League Park IV in Cleveland; Earl Wilson vs. Angels on June 6, 1962 at Fenway Park in Boston; Rick Wise vs. Reds on June 23, 1971 at Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati).
  • Tobin walked Paul Waner to lead off the game, then retired the next 26 batters before walking Waner again with two outs in the ninth before completing his no-hitter.
  • Tobin tossed a one-hitter in his previous start against the Phillies, allowing only a sixth inning single to Moon Mullen.
  • Contemporary accounts speculated that Tobin was the first knuckleballer to throw a no-hitter, but Eddie Cicotte (vs. Browns on April 14, 1917 at Sportsman's Park III in St. Louis) told Baseball Magazine in 1917 that of 100 pitches he threw each game, 75 were knuckleballs.| Cardinals hurler Jesse Haines (vs. Braves on July 17, 1924 at Sportsman's Park III) and White Sox pitcher Ted Lyons (vs. Red Sox on August 21, 1926 at Fenway Park in Boston) also threw knuckleballs, but Haines didn't rely much on his knuckleball in 1924 and Lyons didn't start throwing his until 1929.

8/11/1950: Vern Bickford

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Vern Bickford
9.0
0
0
0
4
3
0
4
30
26
0
1
0
12
11
0
0
Opposing Starter: Carl Erskine
Catcher: Walker Cooper
Plate Umpire: Larry Goetz
Attendance: 29008
Time of Game: 2:05
Did You Know?
  • When Vern Bickford stepped to the plate in the bottom of the eighth, the Boston crowd gave him a loud cheer and urged him to strike out to preserve his strength. When he obliged by whiffing on three straight pitches, the crowd gave him a second ovation.
  • Of the four walks Bickford allowed, two came in the top of the ninth and the Dodgers had runners at first and second with one out, but Duke Snider grounded into a double to end the game.
  • Bickford almost didn't make this start after taking a Pete Reiser line drive off his elbow during batting practice the day before.
  • Bickford needed only 97 pitches and got behind in the count on only four batters, all of whom walked.
  • This was the second of two no-hitters caught by Walker Cooper (Lon Warneke vs. Reds on August 30, 1941 at Crosley Field in Cincinnati).

5/6/1951: Cliff Chambers

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Cliff Chambers
9.0
0
0
0
8
4
0
8
34
24
0
1
0
11
11
0
0
Opposing Starter: George Estock
Catcher: Ed Fitz Gerald
Plate Umpire: Frank Dascoli
Attendance: 15492
Time of Game: 2:01
Did You Know?
  • Though Nick Maddox threw the first no-hitter in Pirates history (vs. Superbas on September 20, 1907 at Exposition Park III in Pittsburgh), Maddox allowed a run and Chambers was the first to throw a no-hit, no-run game for the Pirates.
  • His eight walks tied Johnny Vander Meer (vs. Dodgers on June 15, 1938 at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn) for the most in a modern-era no-hitter until Jim Maloney walked 10 Cubs on August 19, 1965 at Wrigley Field in Chicago.
  • Chambers reportedly had the flu but he was so dominant early on that Pirates coach Babe Herman predicted Chambers would throw a no-hitter in the third inning.
  • Opposing and losing pitcher George Estock appeared in 37 games in 1951, his only year in the major leagues, but this was his only start.
  • In Chambers' next five starts after his no-hitter, opposing batters hit .371 against him and the Pirates went 0-5 before the pitcher was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals on June 15.