Crosley Field
aka Redland Field

1912 - 1970

Cincinnati, OH
Historic Aerials
What Was There

Team Years Games
Reds
(1912 - 1970)
4544
No-Hitters

5/11/1919: Hod Eller

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE
Hod Eller
9.0
0
0
0
3
8
0
3
28
25
1
0
Opposing Starter: Jakie May
Catcher: Bill Rariden
Plate Umpire: Hank O'Day
Attendance: 5500
Time of Game: 1:40
Did You Know?
  • Eller's no-hitter was the first thrown in Cincinnati since 1900 (Noodles Hahn vs. Phillies on July 12, 1900 at League Park II).
  • Eller walked Rogers Hornsby in the second, and Walton Cruise and pinch-hitter Joe Schultz in succession in the eighth inning, but Hornsby and Cruise were thrown out stealing and Eller faced only 28 batters.
  • Only five balls were hit to the outfield and no ball was hit hard or required much effort by Cincinnati's defense.
  • Eller followed his no-hitter with a 13-inning shutout against the Dodgers.

6/11/1938: Johnny Vander Meer

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Johnny Vander Meer
9.0
0
0
0
3
4
0
3
28
25
0
0
0
11
10
3
0
Opposing Starter: Danny MacFayden
Catcher: Ernie Lombardi
Plate Umpire: George Magerkurth
Attendance: 5814
Time of Game: 1:45
Did You Know?
  • This was the first of consecutive no-hitters by Johnny Vander Meer (vs. Dodgers on June 15, 1938 at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn).
  • It's also the first of two no-hitters caught by Ernie Lombardi (Johnny Vander Meer vs. Dodgers on June 15, 1938 at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn).
  • Lombardi is the first catcher and one of four to have caught two no-hitters thrown by the same pitcher in the same season (Yogi Berra and Allie Reynolds, 1951; Carlos Ruiz and Roy Halladay, 2010; Wilson Ramos and Max Scherzer, 2015).

4/30/1940: Tex Carleton

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Tex Carleton
9.0
0
0
0
2
4
0
4
30
28
0
0
2
12
12
1
0
Opposing Starter: Jim Turner
Catcher: Herman Franks
Plate Umpire: Bill Stewart
Attendance: 10544
Time of Game: 1:47
Did You Know?
  • Tex Carleton's no-hitter came in his second start after returning to the big leagues after the 32-year-old, seven-year veteran was demoted to Milwaukee of the American Association in 1939 after struggling through 1938 with pain in his elbow caused by a chip.
  • He contemplated retirement before getting a tryout with the Dodgers and earning a spot in Brooklyn's rotation.
  • Carleton's no-hitter came in his 187th career start of 202 he made before retiring after a brief stint with the Montreal Royals in 1941.
  • Ival Goodman, the last Reds batter of the game, lined a ball to center field that looked like it might drop for a hit, but center fielder Dixie Walked raced in and snared the ball at his knees for the final out.
  • Catcher Herman Franks was making only his ninth major league start when he caught Carleton's no-hitter.

8/30/1941: Lon Warneke

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Lon Warneke
9.0
0
0
0
1
2
0
3
28
27
0
1
2
10
15
1
0
Opposing Starter: Elmer Riddle
Catcher: Walker Cooper
Plate Umpire: Jocko Conlan
Attendance: 9859
Time of Game: 1:50
Did You Know?
  • Against Reds starter Elmer Riddle, the Cardinals had at least one runner on base in the first seven innings, but didn't score until there were two outs in the seventh when center fielder Harry Craft made an error that allowed both Jimmy Brown and Johnny Hopp to score. The official scorer's decision was controversial and even St. Louis Post-Dispatch writer, J. Roy Stockton, thought the line drive to right-center field hit by Don Padgett should have been ruled a double since Craft had to hustle to get to the ball and barely got his glove on it.
  • Shortstop Marty Marion might have saved Lon Warneke's no-hitter in the ninth inning when he ranged behind second base to snare pinch-hitter Ernie Koy's one-out grounder and threw him out by half a step.
  • Riddle was 15-2 going into the game and fell to 15-3, but lost only one more game en route to a 19-4 season.
  • Although Warneke's pitching line shows 15 fly balls, Cardinals outfielders--Don Padgett, Johnny Hopp, and Estel Crabtree--recorded only one putout each.
  • Warneke had a 10-inning outing against the Phillies on August 22 and rested for seven days before his win against Riddle and the Reds.
  • Warneke missed out on a no-hitter against the Phillies on June 10, 1941 when he surrendered a lead-off single to Heinie Mueller, then retired the next 27 batters to complete his fourth career one-hitter.
  • This was the first of two no-hitters caught by Walker Cooper (Vern Bickford vs. Dodgers on August 11, 1950 at Braves Field in Boston).

5/15/1944: Clyde Shoun

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Clyde Shoun
9.0
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
28
27
0
0
0
7
19
2
0
Opposing Starter: Jim Tobin
Catcher: Ray Mueller
Plate Umpire: Beans Reardon
Attendance: 1014
Time of Game: 1:19
Did You Know?
  • Clyde Shoun missed spring training after being inducted into the United States Navy and was awaiting a call to duty when the 1944 season began.
  • Shoun didn't make his first appearance until April 27 and pitched in relief four times before holding the Braves hitless in his first start of the year.
  • The only Braves batter to reach base was opposing pitcher Jim Tobin, who walked with two outs in the third inning. Tobin went into the game with a .407 on-base percentage, had more walks than strikeouts, and had homered in his own no-hitter thrown only 19 days before (vs. Dodgers on April 27 at Braves Field in Boston).
  • The only run scored in the fifth inning on Chuck Aleno's second and last career home run.
  • With an attendance of only 1,014, this is the smallest crowd to witness a no-hitter in the modern era.
  • At only an hour and 19 minutes, this is tied for the fastest no-hitter thrown in the modern era (Dave Davenport vs. Chicago Whales on September 7, 1915 at Handlan's Park in St. Louis).

6/18/1947: Ewell Blackwell

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Ewell Blackwell
9.0
0
0
0
4
3
0
4
30
25
0
0
0
9
14
2
2
Opposing Starter: Ed Wright
Catcher: Ray Lamanno
Plate Umpire: Al Barlick
Attendance: 18137
Time of Game: 1:51
Did You Know?
  • Cincinnati's six runs came courtesy of two Babe Young three-run homers, one in the first inning against Ed Wright and one in the eighth inning off Andy Karl.
  • This was the third time since 1944 that the Braves were held hitless and they were the only NL team to be on the wrong end of a no-hitter in that span.
  • Ewell Blackwell almost replicated what Reds hurler Johnny Vander Meer did when he threw consecutive no-hitters against the Braves (then known as the Bees) and Dodgers on June 11 and June 15, 1938. After his no-hitter against the Braves, Blackwell faced the Dodgers four days later and went 8 1/3 no-hit innings before surrendering a single to Eddie Stanky.

4/30/1969: Jim Maloney

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Jim Maloney
9.0
0
0
0
5
13
0
5
31
26
0
0
0
7
6
2
3
Opposing Starter: Wade Blasingame
Catcher: Johnny Bench
Plate Umpire: Frank Secory
Attendance: 3898
Time of Game: 2:28
Did You Know?
  • This was the second of two career no-hitters thrown by Jim Maloney (vs. Cubs on August 19, 1965 at Wrigley Field in Chicago).
  • After the game, Astros manager Harry Walker insisted Maloney was throwing a greaseball, using a substance perhaps hidden somewhere on his neck.

5/1/1969: Don Wilson

Pitcher IP H R ER BB SO HBP BR BF AB IBB GDP ROE GB FB LD PU
Don Wilson
9.0
0
0
0
6
13
1
7
34
27
0
0
0
1
13
0
2
Opposing Starter: Jim Merritt
Catcher: Don Bryant
Plate Umpire: Satch Davidson
Attendance: 4042
Time of Game: 2:32
Did You Know?
  • This was the second of two career no-hitters thrown by Don Wilson (vs. Braves on June 18, 1967 at Astrodome in Houston).
  • This was the third time in modern-era history no-hitters were thrown on consecutive days and the second time teams turned the trick against each other (Gaylord Perry vs. Cardinals on September 17, 1968 at Candlestick Park in San Francisco; Ray Washburn vs. Giants on September 18, 1968 at Candlestick Park).
  • Houston third baseman Doug Rader was the only Astro to record an assist---on an Alex Johnson grounder in the first; every other out was via strikeout, flyball or pop up.
  • Wilson holds the modern-era record for fewest groundouts in a no-hitter.